Luther

View previous topic View next topic Go down

Luther

Post by stoupaduck on Tue May 11, 2010 10:18 pm

Don't generally do a lot of TV, but am enjoying this - anyone else following it?
avatar
stoupaduck
Godlike Member
Godlike Member

Posts : 2973
Join date : 2008-02-10
Age : 69
Location : Half way between the doghouse and the madhouse

Back to top Go down

Re: Luther

Post by kidder on Wed May 12, 2010 10:09 am

Afraid I don't watch TV much John. Only when Carol is watching all the re-runs of Heartbeat and Born and bred etc.
What is Luther about ?

_________________
avatar
kidder
Patriarch
Patriarch

Posts : 7062
Join date : 2008-01-15
Location : Cumbria

Back to top Go down

Re: Luther

Post by stoupaduck on Wed May 12, 2010 11:29 am

Cliched stuff to some extent. Maverick black senior police detective with marital problems. Nicely observed and well paced with good touches of humour.

From The Guardian,

"
Fed up with half-measures, double-talk, compromise and corruption, the nation was ready for a different kind of leader. The kind of man who doesn't shrink from being a man, especially if that involves inflicting extreme violence on paedophiles and Middle Eastern terrorists. As such, it was always going to be a two-horse race: John Luther or John Porter. Forget Clegg and Cameron, those shiny-faced public school boys if Luther (BBC1) and Chris Ryan's Strike Back are in any sense a reflection of a cultural mood shift, now is the hour of the muscular, tasty geezer.

Take the monumental DCI Luther (Idris Elba ), for example, a bloke who is not afraid to get in touch with his masculine side. He's married to a humanitarian lawyer is there any other kind? but they are estranged following his near-lethal neglect of a child killer's human rights.

When his wife told him that her love of humanity had taken particular focus on another chap, did he suggest a visit to couples therapy or make concerned efforts to "understand" the problem? No, he took it like a real man. Alas, the sitting room door took it less well, both its upper and lower panels falling victim to Luther's impassioned assault.

Few inanimate objects are safe around the detective. His office desk found itself upended after a displeasing phone call, and when he surveys a room, he seems less as though he's seeking clues than something firm to butt. Brooding, hot-tempered and built like an outdoor lavatory, Luther is the latest in a long line of fictional detectives whose bedtime reading doesn't include the rule book.

Fortunately, Saskia Reeves, who plays his boss, is on hand to explain some of those boring criminal justice requirements like evidence and the need to construct a case which appear not to have featured in the DCI's training.

Luther's investigative approach owes more to the learned psychological insight that used to guide Robbie Coltrane's "Fitz" in Cracker. Fitz could observe the chalk outline of a corpse and be able to work out from it at what age the victim lost his virginity and whether his mother loved him. Luther's not that good, but he could tell when a suspect failed to match his yawn with one of her own that she was obviously guilty of slaughtering her parents which is a handy talent for a cop.

In other words, Luther is another piece of highly stylised nonsense, pitched somewhere in that territory between fantasy and cliche that commissioning editors find so irresistible. One can't help but compare Elba's meticulous performance as "Stringer" Bell, the savvy drug baron in The Wire, with this more cartoonish creation, but it's a futile study.

The Wire
was an exceptional piece of television and Luther is, in most ways, a typical effort at entertainment. What sets it slightly apart is a black lead, an open-ended plot and a gallery of deviants and fruitcakes all of which is to be welcomed. Last week saw Ruth Wilson playing a kind of Ruth Lawrence-type child prodigy who'd matured into a homicidal nymphomaniac. Luther explained that, while she may have been smart, criminals slip up all the time.

"That's just faulty logic postulated on imperfect data collection," she replied, looking as though she'd just located the "on" switch on a sex aid. "What if you only catch people who make mistakes? That would skew the figures, wouldn't it?"

Not really, he should have responded, they're the ones who are logged under "unsolved crimes". But like the show, Luther is not quite as clever as he thinks he is."
avatar
stoupaduck
Godlike Member
Godlike Member

Posts : 2973
Join date : 2008-02-10
Age : 69
Location : Half way between the doghouse and the madhouse

Back to top Go down

Re: Luther

Post by VickyS on Wed May 12, 2010 4:47 pm

I've watched both episodes. I enjoyed the second episode more than the first. I think the Guardian's description of it as 'highly stylised nonsense' is probably right!

VickyS
Matriarch2
Matriarch2

Posts : 14936
Join date : 2008-06-19

Back to top Go down

Re: Luther

Post by Sponsored content


Sponsored content


Back to top Go down

View previous topic View next topic Back to top

- Similar topics

 
Permissions in this forum:
You cannot reply to topics in this forum